Image from Balcony Garden Web

Years ago, not a lot of people are truly trying to understand the massive benefits of gardening. But with the rising costs of food and fuel, more and more people are discovering the practicality of maintaining a home garden, not to mention the amount of fun one can possibly get from having one. If you’re somehow concerned that starting a home garden will entail a lot of work and lots of money, then don’t be, because there are tons of ways to start your very own home harden without spending a fortune.

The Types of Home Gardens

Container garden

This is probably the easiest one to start with, especially if you don’t have much space in your property. With this, you may have a trial-and-error period, but know that ultimately, it’s going to be worth it. The need the following supplies to start:

  • Garden soil
  • Containers
  • Tiller or hand rake
  • Water
  • Seeds
  • Compost (for heavy-feeding plants; i.e. squash)

The initial cost you’ll spend will depend on where and when you decide to purchase all your supplies. During the spring, most gardening supply stores give out their gardening soil almost free of charge. Container price will range between $5-$10 each, while your other items are generally around the $2-$5 per item price tag. So overall, a decent initial set-up may cost you around $100; can be smaller than that if you manage to salvage a few containers from friends or other people who are also in to gardening.

What you can grow:

A key thing to remember when gardening in containers is that your plant roots can only go down so far. Better ensure that your containers have enough depth to sustain your plants.

Here’s what can grow well in containers:

  • Cucumbers
  • Tomatoes
  • Carrots
  • Peppers
  • Potatoes
  • Green beans
  • Turnips
  • Squash
  • Lettuce
  • Green onions

The in-ground garden bed

If you have a little more space in your property and you have good soil, you may opt for an in-ground garden bed.  A garden like this which measures roughly 500 meters can be enough to provide a family of four for a span of 6-8 months.

What you’ll need:

  • Tiller
  • Seeds
  • Compost
  • Trellis/stakes
  • A small fence of stones or brick (to prevent ground runoff after heavy or torrential rains.)

What you can grow:

  • Beets
  • Corn
  • Cabbage
  • Watermelon
  • Pumpkins
  • Squash
  • Tomatoes
  • Eggplant
  • Peppers
Image from Bonnie Plants

The raised-bed garden

This type of garden has the capacity to offer you with higher yields. It is advisable for larger spaces and can be a great choice especially if you know that your soil condition is less than ideal.

What you’ll need:

  • Rot-resistant wood boards
  • Old newspapers
  • Peat moss
  • Top soil
  • Grass clippings
  • Compost
  • Hand tiller
  • Water
  • Seeds

What you can grow:

  • Asparagus
  • Beans
  • Pumpkins
  • Brussels sprouts
  • Rhubarb
  • Broccoli
  • Spinach

The window-box garden

This is ideal for those living in confined spaces like condos and apartments.

What you’ll need:

  • Hanging/window box
  • Seeds
  • Water
  • Garden soil

What you can grow:

  • Spinach
  • Lettuce
  • Carrots
  • Tomatoes
  • Tubers
  • Basil
  • Chives
  • Oregano

If this is your first time to dabble in horticultural work, just remember that in any type of project, you’re bound to have some mistakes and failures. It’s a normal thing, especially in gardening.  Try to resist the urge to buy a lot of expensive tools and only start out with the basics and a few plants.  Once you got the hang of it, you can then move on to more complex gardening processes.  There’s really nothing more gratifying than seeing your plants grow from mere seeds to table, plus you’ll save a lot of money if you kept on doing this for a long time.

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